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Shichi-Go-San (七五三) or “Seven- Five Three” is a traditional rite of passage and festival day in Japan for girls (ages 3 & 7) and boys (ages 3 & 5), held annually on November 15 to celebrate the growth and well-being of young children. 

The ages 3, 5 and 7 are consistent with East Asian numerology, which claims that odd numbers are lucky.
Particularly, at the age of seven, a young girl celebrates wearing her first obi, while at the age of five, a young boy celebrates wearing his first hakama pants in public. The age of three marks the first time whereby both boys and girls are allowed to let their hair grow.

Sooo Cute!!!

(出典: gn-a)

the-iridescence:

Art Aquarium Exhibition in Tokyo

Visitors watch “kingyo,” or goldfish, swimming in a polyhedral aquarium on the opening day of the Art Aquarium Exhibition in Tokyo. The annual exhibition produced by Hidetomo Kimura was the collaboration of Japan’s old Edo period atmosphere, modern technology and the kingyo, the organizer said.

(出典: dearbuddha)

hiiroomixx:

10月〜のマロンクリーム気になる🌰 #トトロ #デザート #白髭のシュークリーム

hiiroomixx:

10月〜のマロンクリーム気になる🌰 #トトロ #デザート #白髭のシュークリーム

18 Japanese Desserts the Emperor Might Eat

ornamatique:

       

These traditional Japanese desserts (Wagashi) are served in top restaurants in Tokyo or Kyoto. The Emperor might even eat these sweets.

1. Namagashi (生菓子)

Namagashi is the general term for sweets used in Japanese tea ceremony. They must be aesthetically pleasing. Many contain sweetened bean paste.

Namagashi

2. Sakuramochi (桜餅)

Sweet pink mochi (rice cake) filled with red bean paste and covered with a cherry blossom leaf (sakura). Sakura mochi are eaten to celebrate girl’s day (Hinamatsuri) in Japan every March 3rd.

Sakuramochi

3. Amanatto (甘納豆)

Beans (often azuki beans) covered in sugar.

amanatto

4. Kompeito (甘納豆)

Kompeito candies are small colored candies of pure sugar . They’re round and have small bumps that occur naturally as part of the cooking process.

Sugar was first introduced to Japan by Portuguese traders in the 16th century. For many years afterward sugar continued to be rare and precious in Japan. Kompeito are the traditional thank-you-for-visiting gift of the Imperial House of Japan (the Emperor).

Kompeito

5. Hanabiramochi (葩餅)

Hanabiramochi means “flower petal mochi”. It’s traditionally served at the first tea ceremony of the new year. This tradition began with the Imperial Family. Hanabiramochi has a distinctive shape and color. It’s filled with mung bean paste. The shape and colors of the hanabiramochi have symbolic meaning (related to a new year).

Hanabiramochi Japanese desert

6.Suama (寿甘)

Suama is a dessert made of rice flour and sugar. It uses red food dye on the outside and remains white on the inside. This is to symbolize Japan. However, it often turns out pink and white.

Suama

7.Wasanbon (和三盆)

Wasanbon are multicolored sugar candies. They’re made of a very finely ground domestic (Japanese) sugar. Domestic agricultural products are far more expensive than imports. Domestic sugar might cost 10x the price of imported sugar. Domestic sugar is used to create special products such as Wasanbon.

Wasanbon

8. Botamochi (ぼたもち)

A seasonal treat (spring) made with sweet rice and red bean paste.

botamochi

9. Karukan (軽羹)

A dessert from Kyushu made of rice flour, sugar and Japanese yam.

Karukan Japaneses desert

10. Uiro (外郎)

Uiro are traditional Japanese steam cakes. They’re chewy and slightly sweet. They come in various flavors such as green tea, sakura, strawberry and chestnut.

Uiro

11. Dango (団子)

Dango are Japanese dumplings that are similar to mochi. They’re served on sticks of three or four. Flavours vary by season.

dango traditional Japanese desert

12. Monaka (最中)

Sweet red bean paste inside a crisp mochi wafer.

Monaka

13. Yokan (羊羹)

Yokan is a thick jelly dessert made of red bean paste, agar, and sugar. They often have green tea powder, chopped chestnuts, whole sweetened beans or other ingredients suspended in the jelly.

Yokan Japanese desert

14. Manju (饅頭)

Manju are Japanese sweet dumplings that have a variety of fillings.

Strawberry manju

15. Kuzumochi (葛餅)

Mochi made with starch powder from the root of the kudzu plant.

Kuzumochi

16.Kusa Mochi (草餅)

Kusa Mochi means “grass mochi”. It’s mochi made with powder from the leaves of the Japanese mugwort plant. It’s traditionally eaten in spring. Kusa Mochi is usually served with sweet soybean flour as a topping.

kusa mochi Japanese desert

17. Taiyaki (たい焼き)

Taiyaki is a Japanese fish shaped cake. It is commonly filled with red bean paste, cheese or custard.

taiyaki

18. Yatsuhashi

A specialty of Kyoto that has the texture of mochi and contains cinnamon. They’re sometimes baked and crunchy. Other times they’re served soft with red bean paste filling.

Yatsuhashi

Wagashi is Mostly Mochi and Red Bean Paste

Well, that’s a fairly extensive overview of Wagashi (traditional Japanese deserts). As you can see from the list, the Emperor of Japan eats a great deal of mochi and red bean paste.

Meiji

hiiroomixx:

崎陽軒の秋のおべんとう。 #崎陽軒 #伊豆旅行2014 (Yokohama Station)

hiiroomixx:

崎陽軒の秋のおべんとう。 #崎陽軒 #伊豆旅行2014 (Yokohama Station)


(。-ω-) 2014.09.01 tokyodon’t remove this text.
(。-ω-) 2014.09.01 tokyo
don’t remove this text.

"Hitachi Seaside Park is a sprawling 470 acre park located in Hitachinaka, Ibaraki, Japan, that features vast flower gardens including millions of daffodils, 170 varieties of tulips, and an estimated 4.5 million baby blue eyes (Nemophila). The sea on blue flowers blooms once annually around April in an event referred to as the “Nemophila Harmony.”

"Hitachi Seaside Park is a sprawling 470 acre park located in Hitachinaka, Ibaraki, Japan, that features vast flower gardens including millions of daffodils, 170 varieties of tulips, and an estimated 4.5 million baby blue eyes (Nemophila). The sea on blue flowers blooms once annually around April in an event referred to as the “Nemophila Harmony.”

(出典: wasbella102)

did-you-kno:

The vines of a wisteria plant in Japan’s Ashikaga Flower Park have been trained for over 100 years to resemble a tree that measures 10,000 square feet.  Source

did-you-kno:

The vines of a wisteria plant in Japan’s Ashikaga Flower Park have been trained for over 100 years to resemble a tree that measures 10,000 square feet. Source

herwanderlove:

farfromthepacific:

i-leftmyheartinkyoto:

everybodyhasclaimedeverything:

sizvideos:

Video

O

This happened to me when I was in Japan and it’s something I’ll never forget.

omgggggggggg

I love you Japan.

did-you-kno:

Zoo Jeans is a company that lets lions, tigers, and bears “design” jeans by tearing holes in the denim. The finished products are auctioned off to raise money for the Kamine Zoo in Hitachi, Japan. Source

did-you-kno:

Zoo Jeans is a company that lets lions, tigers, and bears “design” jeans by tearing holes in the denim. The finished products are auctioned off to raise money for the Kamine Zoo in Hitachi, Japan. Source